1962
2015
Former building at 50 Ottawa in Lebreton Flats in Ottawa in 1962
Construction site at Lebreton Flats
sources
City of Ottawa
Title: Untitled. Reference number: No reference number provided.
We gave it a
-5
An entire district demolished by the NCC and they let it rot for more than 50 years.
Visitors's vote
-4.1
82 votes
Vote here
  • -5
  • -3
  • 0
  • +3
  • +5
better
now
better
before
The 50 Ottawa Street at the intersection of Booth Street was once again light years away from where the same location is in 2015.  The 3-story building had interesting architectural details like its pronounced cornice and the tiles at the entrance of the shops.  

A confectionery and Up Town Rose Lunch occupied the commercial space on the ground floor.

Ottawa Street was running East-West and was located North of Albert Street.

We can even see two kids (one is hidden and we can only see one wheel of his tricycle) running down Ottawa Street with their tricycle. This is really a small detail in the photo, but reveals an important aspect of the former Lebreton Flats: security.  This photo was not staged and it shows that the flats were secure enough to have parents let their kids play on the street.  This would never happen nowadays as it is impossible to think that someone could let their kids play on the Booth Street, Albert Street or Si John A. Macdonald Parkway.  

Despite having stated that the revitalization of Lebreton Flats is a priorty for both the city of Ottawa and the NCC, its implementation is broken in many ways.  For example, by widening Albert Street they prioritize cars and commuters over other alternative mean of transportation.  This absolute and short-sighted priority is in contradiction with the $2B invertment into the LRT that will serve Lebreton Flats (Pimisi).  It is as if they really want to have the train to be empty. 
25 MAY
2015
Urban Nation
Good points, except for the fact that it is the City, not NCC who is widening Albert Street. Now, if you wanted to apply that logic to the way Wellington Street was designed through the Flats, you'd be spot on. Too wide, too auto-oriented.
26 MAY
2015
Keith A.
Land lying dormant for that long is a sham. Maybe the city/NCC should give back $$ for the increase in land value to those whom had their land expropriated for no good reason...
26 MAY
2015
Paul Graveline
At one point the proprietor was Abraham Ghattas who then moved to Carling Ave in Britannia (Ghattas Confectionary). Abe passed away a few years ago and the business was closed
26 MAY
2015
RB
"A confectionery and Up Town Rose Lunch occupied the commercial space on the ground floor."

Up Town was a citrus drink similar to 7-Up. You're confusing an advertising sign for a well-known soft drink with the name of a store.

"This photo was not staged and it shows that the flats were secure enough to have parents let their kids play on the street."

Lebreton flats was a rough neighbourhood. Kids played on the street, got into trouble, started fights and generally lived outside.
Kids from that time played on the street wherever they lived. The world was a very different place. Today's concepts of parenting would have been foreign back then. When you say that "This would never happen nowadays," what kind of point are you trying to make? I can tell you 100% that to turn on the television and watch Johnny Jellybean would never happen nowadays, as the tapes from this show, that aired in the early 1960s, were all destroyed. It's a fact, yes, but was it really worth saying at all?
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